Schwab Survey Finds More Than Half of Boomers Expect to Retire Debt Free

Results from a survey of baby boomers ages 50 to 60 found the majority (54 percent) does not expect to delay their planned retirement date despite challenging economic conditions, while significantly fewer (38 percent) expect to retire later than they had originally planned.

Conducted by Charles Schwab for its Quarterly Retirement Survey, the data reveals that baby boomers approaching retirement in today’s rocky economic conditions have maintained a surprisingly stable view about their retirement prospects says the company.

“While the current economic environment has certainly influenced the saving and spending habits of investors, we found it encouraging that people are approaching the transition into retirement with the optimism they can stick to their retirement timelines,” said Schwab financial consultant Tad Fryer. “It is reassuring to see that this key segment of the boomer generation appears confident about their plans, and also rightfully focused on finding creative ways to make the transition work and get the most out of this stage of life.”

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Supporting that sense of calm is an emerging perspective among this demographic that retirement is not necessarily a sudden shift from “on” to “off” – 88 percent of those surveyed expect to continue to work even after becoming eligible for full retirement benefits, citing “the need for more money” (28 percent) as the leading reason, followed closely by “a desire to remain active mentally, physically or socially” (25 percent).

Asked if they expected they would need financial support from others at some point during retirement, the vast majority (74 percent) said “no.”

More than half (54 percent) feel it is likely they will enter retirement debt free, see here.

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  • The article refers to stability. Not once in that article was anything stated about comparing attitudes between two different points in time. So what stability is being referenced? rnrnIt is odd that the responses of these respondents were not compared to similar responses of other near term retirees in prior years or to the responses of the same cohort before the economic downturn. That would have been informative.rnrnIt is staggering to read that 88% of all of those interviewed expected to continue working into retirement no matter what the primary reason given. I doubt if there is another generation nearing retirement since 1965 which had that outlook. rnrnIf it were not for the recent economic downturn it would have been surprising to read that such a high percentage of those retiring will be retiring with debt. It would have been helpful to have cited a breakdown of that debt. Is it primarily principal residence mortgage or some other type of debt?rn

  • The article refers to stability. Not once in that article was anything stated about comparing attitudes between two different points in time. So what stability is being referenced? rnrnIt is odd that the responses of these respondents were not compared to similar responses of other near term retirees in prior years or to the responses of the same cohort before the economic downturn. That would have been informative.rnrnIt is staggering to read that 88% of all of those interviewed expected to continue working into retirement no matter what the primary reason given. I doubt if there is another generation nearing retirement since 1965 which had that outlook. rnrnIf it were not for the recent economic downturn it would have been surprising to read that such a high percentage of those retiring will be retiring with debt. It would have been helpful to have cited a breakdown of that debt. Is it primarily principal residence mortgage or some other type of debt?rn

  • The article refers to stability. Not once in that article was anything stated about comparing attitudes between two different points in time. So what stability is being referenced? rnrnIt is odd that the responses of these respondents were not compared to similar responses of other near term retirees in prior years or to the responses of the same cohort before the economic downturn. That would have been informative.rnrnIt is staggering to read that 88% of all of those interviewed expected to continue working into retirement no matter what the primary reason given. I doubt if there is another generation nearing retirement since 1965 which had that outlook. rnrnIf it were not for the recent economic downturn it would have been surprising to read that such a high percentage of those retiring will be retiring with debt. It would have been helpful to have cited a breakdown of that debt. Is it primarily principal residence mortgage or some other type of debt?rn

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